Teaching

"The successful teacher is no longer on a height, pumping knowledge at high pressure into passive receptacles...he is a senior student anxious to help his minors."

-quote from Sir William Osler (1849-1919). Often described as the father of modern medicine, he was a bibliophile, historian, scientist and apparently a renowned practical joker. He died in 1919 during the Spanish influenza epidemic.

Human Neuroscience ~ CSCD 3235

Course Description

This class is an introduction to the anatomy, organization, and function of the human nervous system, with an emphasis on the neurobehavioral disorders that result from damage to the brain. It aims to promote familiarity with the basic anatomy and physiology of the human nervous system, its control of physical functions and its mediation of cognitive and emotional behaviors. By the very nature of the subject matter, the course requires learning the terminology that is typically used to describe components of the nervous system. In addition, students will learn to identify the location and function critical areas and structures. The course will also review the effects of pathology or injury to the nervous system on motor function,sensation, cognition and emotion.

Please scroll through the section below to view comments which represent a sample of the feedback provided by students on end of term anonymous course evaluations in response to the question: "What aspects of the course or the instructor’s approach contributed most to your learning? "

I received my doctorate from the University of Oxford in England, spending much of my time in the University Laboratory of Physiology. I was inspired by the class pictures that lined the classrooms and hallways, and decided to bring this tradition to Temple University. Each year, I take class photos of my Human Neuroscience and post them here to carry on this special tradition.

Neuroscience Class pictures

Research Methods in Communication Sciences ~ CSCD 2201

Course Description

This class introduces quantitative research methods in the communication sciences. It covers a variety of study domains including field/descriptive, correlational, survey, clinical, ethnographic, and experimental research designs. Students learn various research methods for addressing particular types of research questions. Concepts covered include types of variables, parametric and nonparametric inferential statistics, sampling designs, hypothesis testing, and publication policies.

Please scroll through the section below to view comments which represent a sample of the feedback provided by students on end of term anonymous course evaluations in response to the question: "What aspects of the course or the instructor’s approach contributed most to your learning? "