Teaching

"Swiftly the head mass becomes an enchanted loom where millions of flashing shuttles weave a dissolving pattern, a shifting harmony of sub patterns."

-A quote from Sir Charles Sherrington, eminent neurophysiologist, describing the awake brain in his lecture, "Brain and its works" at the University of Edinburgh.

Human Neuroscience ~ CSCD 3235

Course Description

This class is an introduction to the anatomy, organization, and function of the human nervous system, with an emphasis on the neurobehavioral disorders that result from damage to the brain. It aims to promote familiarity with the basic anatomy and physiology of the human nervous system, its control of physical functions and its mediation of cognitive and emotional behaviors. By the very nature of the subject matter, the course requires learning the terminology that is typically used to describe components of the nervous system. In addition, students will learn to identify the location and function critical areas and structures. The course will also review the effects of pathology or injury to the nervous system on motor function,sensation, cognition and emotion.

Please scroll through the section below to view comments which represent a sample of the feedback provided by students on end of term anonymous course evaluations in response to the question: "What aspects of the course or the instructor’s approach contributed most to your learning? "

Dr. Gerry Stefanatos attended The University of Oxford in England where he received his doctorate in Clinical Neuropsychology. He spent much of his time in the University Laboratory of Physiology. Inspired by class pictures that lined the walls of the laboratory classrooms, Dr. Steafanatos decided to take this Oxford tradition and bring it to Temple University where he takes a class photo with his Human Neuroscience class every year.

Neuroscience Class pictures

Research Methods in Communication Sciences ~ CSCD 2201

Course Description

This class introduces quantitative research methods in the communication sciences. It covers a variety of study domains including field/descriptive, correlational, survey, clinical, ethnographic, and experimental research designs. Students learn various research methods for addressing particular types of research questions. Concepts covered include types of variables, parametric and nonparametric inferential statistics, sampling designs, hypothesis testing, and publication policies.

Please scroll through the section below to view comments which represent a sample of the feedback provided by students on end of term anonymous course evaluations in response to the question: "What aspects of the course or the instructor’s approach contributed most to your learning? "